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Reasons to consider a prenup before getting married

Many people think that prenuptial agreements are a luxury for the super-rich, and that they serve little purpose for “regular” couples. However, this is simply not the case. Prenuptial agreements can be beneficial for a variety of reasons. Here are a few that might be worth considering for Georgia couples about to tie the knot: 

  • It will make it easier and more comfortable to combine finances: Knowing that each person’s assets are accounted for and clearly laid out in the prenuptial agreement will take a major stressor out of the process of combining finances. Once married, finances are automatically combined in the eyes of the law, so having these parameters established can make it more comfortable to settle into the new reality and truly enjoy the process of building a life together. 
     
  • It serves as “insurance”: People do not buy insurance policies because they intend to get into a car accident. In much the same way, people do not enter prenups with the expectation of having a divorce. However, the document can give a sense of security that, even in the worstcase scenario, they have a plan in place.
     
  • It protects assets now and in the future: A person may not have a lot of money in his or her bank account, but what about other accounts? Retirement savings, owned assets and future inheritance can all be considered in a prenuptial agreement. Having this in place can provide peace of mind not only for the signees but also their families.  

Overall, it is clear that a prenuptial agreement is a wise thing to consider for many couples, even those who may not necessarily have a large sum in their bank accounts. Even if a marriage does not end, couples may find that the process of drafting an agreement opens up lines of communication and topics that will support the strength of their marriage. If it does end, having the document will save a lot of resources. Individuals considering a prenuptial agreement in Georgia should reach out to a lawyer in the state to discuss the process and work toward a document both can be happy with. 

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