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Focus on domestic abuse, seminal Violence Against Women Act

It’s venerable, enduring and repeatedly endorsed with wide acclaim across the country, including in Georgia.

But it has not existed over time without criticism from some quarters, as the history surrounding the federal Violence Against Women Act clearly reveals.

A wide swath of the American public understandably rejoiced back in 1994 when then-President Bill Clinton enacted the legislation into law. As an in-depth national article notes, the bill was promoted on the broad grounds of protecting women “on the streets and in homes.”

A notable feature of the act is the statutory requirement that it be periodically revisited and authorized anew by both chambers of Congress. It has routinely passed that hurdle multiple times over the past quarter century.

Including just last week, when the above-cited New York Times piece notes the bill “easily passed” through the House of Representatives. It next proceeds to the U.S. Senate, where it is similarly expected to meet with success

Challenges posed to the legislation over the years have been many and varied. Notably, they have ranged in the past from arguments that its proposed penalties for domestic abusers were too severe to criticisms that relevant criminal provisions were too sweeping. As noted, the bill has always survived opponents’ attempts to eradicate or weaken it, with proponents believing it will similarly do so in the future.

Miles Hansford & Tallant attorneys advocate strongly on behalf of abuse victims. We duly stress on our website that our proven legal team has “more than a decade of experience representing Georgia victims of family violence.”

Individuals with questions about domestic abuse can reach out to experienced and empathetic family law attorneys for a candid and confidential discussion of their concerns.

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